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Library Graduate Attribute Toolkit

Guide to assessment examples to support teaching to achieve graduate attributes.

Solve problems in a variety of settings taking local and international perspectives into account (Graduate Attribute 6)

Relates to the Australian and New Zealand Information Literacy Framework standard:

  • Recognises the need for information and determines the nature and extent of the information needed.
    • Learning outcomes:
      - defines and articulates the information need
      - understands the purpose, scope and appropriateness of a variety of information sources
      - evaluates the nature and extent of the information need
      - uses diverse sources of information to inform decisions

Introductory

Finding Additional and Supporting Information: Provide the students with an article to critique. Have them locate two Internet sources which support their response to the topic. Have them cite the URLs and highlight the points that show support of their response. [1]

Journal Analysis: Analyse the content, style and audience of three journals in a given discipline. This helps to clarify the differences between popular, trade and scholarly journals. [2, 6]

Web Perspectives and Internet Search: Use the Internet to find material that represents a variety of perspectives on a topic, then develop an interpretation of it. Give the students a set of web pages to look at. Have them note any reasons why these pages are, or are not appropriate for university level student research or for in-class use. [3, 4]

Visualise a Topic: Encourage students to think beyond the printed word and utilize image and multimedia databases to gather information about a topic. [5]

Textbook Information to Journal Articles: Choose a relevant topic from your textbook and find two websites and two journal articles relevant to the topic. Cite and compare approaches of all sources. [2, 4]

Intermediate

Newspaper Article: Ask students to write a newspaper article describing an international event - political, social or cultural - based on their research. This is an exercise in critical reading and summarising. The assignment gains interest if several students research the same event using different sources. Compare the articles that result. [2]

Journal Analysis: Advise students to use a database to locate two articles which present differing viewpoints on a given topic or event. This will enable students to explore how journals are published to appeal to and reflect a defined reading constituancy. [2, 3]

Finding Additional and Supporting Information: Provide the students with an article to critique. Have them locate two Internet sources which support their response to the topic. Have them cite the URLs and highlight the points that show support of their response. [1]

Concept Mapping: Have students create visual representations of models, ideas, and the relationship between concepts. [3]

Advanced

Journal Analysis: Ask students to read several articles which appear to address the same issue but reach different conclusions and reflect differing viewpoints. They should identify facts and opinions in each article, and endeavour to verify the facts stated in the articles.This exercise tests and develops evaluative skills. [2]

Textbook Information to Journal articles: Advise students to choose a relevant topic from their textbook and find three websites and three journal articles relevant to the topic. The journal articles and websites should originate from different countries. Cite and compare viewpoints of all sources. [2, 4]

Double Entry Journal: Encourage students to keep a diary throughout the semester, which shows how and what information they have collected for an assignment or project. In a parallel column to this information, they should include reflective comments about experience of gathering and using information. [3, 6]

Analyse Case Studies: Bring in case studies for students to read. Have students discuss and analyse the case study. Students can work in groups or do this as a think-pair-share. [3]

Simulations of Real-Life Projects: Have students prepare a research proposal or business plan. State the specific problem to be solved or task to be accomplished. Provide background on the problem. [2, 3, 4]